Type III German U-Boat


This design was laid out in 1933 and it was basically similar to the Type I-A but with a large circular watertight hangar abaft the conning tower to carry two 10 ton MTBs. The MTBs would be launched by flooding down the submarine until the decks were awash and the MTBs floated free then departed their hangar. When their mission was completed, the MTBs would return, the U-Boat would surface, the MTBs would float into their hangars, watertight doors would be shut and the U-Boat would depart.  Since this would be a smooth water operation only, the design was abandoned. No Type III German U-Boats were built – none even contracted for.

Displacement: unknown Length:                  254′ 3″ Beam:                    26′ 3″ Draft:                   17′ 0″
Power (diesel):   2,800hp Power (electric):   1,000hp Speed (diesel):     17 knots Speed (electric):  8 knots
Bunkers:   unknown Range (diesel):    unknown Range (electric):   unknown Crew:   65 men – includes
the MTB crews
Deck gun:   single 4.1 inch AA guns:    none Tubes (fwd):  four Tubes (aft):   two

The Type III was planned to carry eight torpedoes and two MTBs.

Acknowledgements

Deepest thanks to our friends at the U-Bootskameradschaft Kiel for allowing us to bring their sacred book containing the names of all 28,863 U-Bootfahrer who were lost in action during World War II here to the USA where we carefully copied all the names of the fallen and list them here on our site.  Ours is the only website in the world that lists all these names.

Many thanks to our good friend and Sharkhunters Member since 1987 GEORG HÖGEL (240-LIFE-1987)for all the conning tower emblems used in our monthly KTB Magazine and also here on the pages of our website. GEORG was Funkmaat (radioman) aboard U-30, the first boat into combat, the first to sink a ship (the liner ATHENIA) and the first into an occupied French port.  When that Skipper (Lemp) took command of U-110, GEORG was one of the former crew to transfer to the new boat under Lemp.  After the war, he was Professor of Art at a major German university.

GEORG HÖGEL